Disability Hate Crime

Hello again,

I have been thinking about what to write for my blog and I made a decision based on three things:

An article I saw only in the Yorkshire Evening Post
An event on the train
An event going to get my lunch 

A few weeks ago there was an article in the Yorkshire Evening Post regarding Disability Hate Crime in West Yorkshire. The article talks about how West Yorkshire has the highest rate of Disability Hate Crime in the UK. This makes me quite sad and very angry. As a Disabled Person I should be able to go out and about without the fear of people hating me due to my Disability, or for any reason. No one should have to put up with that.

A few days ago I was getting off the train. The doorway was quite narrow as it was an old train. I went to get off and as I was doing so three people in succession stepped onto the train and bustled past me in the narrow entrance saying ‘sorry’. For those who don’t know I am a long cane user. This means I use a white cane with a rollerball tip to navigate spaces around me. If you image getting off a train with someone walking towards you with a white cane do you honestly think it’s safe to push past them in a narrow train door way? No it is not. You could trip over my cane and fall, I could misjudge the gap between the train and the platform edge meaning I or you fall and seriously injure yourself.

As I got off a lady offered her arm and asked if I was ok. I said yes thank you and thanked her again for waiting. 

The third thing I am basing this post on is an event from yesterday. I was out to get my lunch in town and as I was walking with my cane, something happened. A lady was walking in front of me and as I walked past she said quite openly ‘You don’t need that…faker….you’re putting it on’. Now I am still wearing a mask when out and about, so I was able to pull a face which showed displeasure at this. I also scoffed. Which she clearly didn’t hear.

You might think I should have said something, but I was on my own. You have to wonder if they are willing to act blatantly ableist like that in the middle of a busy high street on a weekend, how are they going to react when confronted?

After posting about these various events on Twitter I got kind words from people asking if I was OK and expressing their concerns.

A few weeks another event occurred walking home. I was again minding my own business when two people wandered past and called me a blind c****. This I was upset by as I was already tired form a long day. But again what can you do? You can’t react because you don’t know how they will react.

The whole point of this blog is to make you aware that these things are happening to Disabled People and it can be very upsetting. It makes it more difficult to want to go out and leave the house.

If you experience someone who is being heckled or having insults thrown their way it can be difficult to know how to react. Potentially ask the person if they are OK? Maybe this will make the person who is being abusive stop as their actions have been noticed. I am not entirely sure how to fix this issue.

It’s upsetting and I wish the world was a nicer place.

Anyway I am cold. I’m off. 

An accessible Dehumidifier?

Hello all, 

This blog might seem a bit boring but I wanted to write it. 

About a week ago my dehumidifier got a crack in it and started leaking. Which is quite dangerous when you can’t see very well and there’s a leak you don’t notice until there is water which you step in and get a soggy sock. Which is how I found out. Which wasn’t good because it was near a plug…

Anyway, we put a big tray underneath to stop the water going near the plug. We then realised it was a leak. So I pulled out the water collector and had a look inside. I could feel a crack on the dehumidifier itself. I unplugged it and decided it was time to buy a new one.

I decided to buy the sam model. It’s a Dimplex one.

Why am I reading this? What are you writing about a dehu for?

The reason I thought I’d write this is because it’s a good little purchase. One of the things I find good is how accessible it is to me. Yes a dehumidifier which is accessible.

The light indicators are a good size. When it’s green it means the room is just right, when it’s blue that means it’s too damp, when its red it means the room is too dry. This is great because if you’re visually impaired you want to have things which are more accessible too you visually or, in a tactile format when it comes to things like this. 

When it comes to the physical buttons they are a good size, the power button, one which is for the timer, you can have it on for up to 8 hours. The third is for the level humidity you want it at – I think I have it on this one all the time. Then I turn it off whenever I want to.

Getting the container out is ok, you have curved edges on the side of the container so you can put your hands in the right place to pull it out. The only issue is that it is a bit cumbersome in that there’s no way to grip it. Ideally it would be nice if you could grip it better.

The tank which collects the water is also good because it is see through. So someone can see how full it is, but you have a light indicator for this. It flashes red when it’s full.

But here’s the really impressive thing. The how to booklet which comes with it is huge! I could read it without any help. The font is a good size and the diagrams are easy to see. I was thoroughly impressed and the booklet alone is reason enough to buy it in my opinion.

Don’t just take my word for it. Argos shoppers, where I bought it from, have giving it some great ratings.

This blog post is not sponsored by Dimplex, I just wanted to write about it because I’m quite impressed.

Enjoy your day. Let me know what purchase you’ve made which accessible to you. 

A white dehumidifier on the floor, it has a grill on the top, with three buttons on top.